Another fine-figured fellow poses with disc in hand, this an anonymous male model from photographer Frank Eugene Smith. A great pity I cannot find a larger copy of this gorgeous image, his pictures appear all the more lovely at a higher resolution.

Another fine-figured fellow poses with disc in hand, this an anonymous male model from photographer Frank Eugene Smith. A great pity I cannot find a larger copy of this gorgeous image, his pictures appear all the more lovely at a higher resolution.

The exquisite Ange Camilli, first prize winner of an early bodybuilding contest in France - probably c1920 from the quality of the photograph and style of his hair. Images from this glorious set are often incorrectly dated to 1863, because of the AN Paris 63 in the lower right - but this refers to publisher Alfred Noyer and his numbered registration of patent on the set.

The exquisite Ange Camilli, first prize winner of an early bodybuilding contest in France - probably c1920 from the quality of the photograph and style of his hair. Images from this glorious set are often incorrectly dated to 1863, because of the AN Paris 63 in the lower right - but this refers to publisher Alfred Noyer and his numbered registration of patent on the set.

George Reynolds, student of Thomas Eakins, photographed in motion with multiple exposures of a Marey Wheel camera, in 1884.

George Reynolds, student of Thomas Eakins, photographed in motion with multiple exposures of a Marey Wheel camera, in 1884.

A 1905 postcard by Wilhelm von Gloeden, beautiful in its tones of hazy blue, and the oh-so-handsome model bedecked with a wreath of laurel leaves. The image is, in fact, cropped from a larger photograph, one of a set taken some time between 1895 and 1898 at Monte Ziretto, Taormina. The full scene, with a second young man almost entirely trimmed out of this postcard version, can be seen here.

A 1905 postcard by Wilhelm von Gloeden, beautiful in its tones of hazy blue, and the oh-so-handsome model bedecked with a wreath of laurel leaves. The image is, in fact, cropped from a larger photograph, one of a set taken some time between 1895 and 1898 at Monte Ziretto, Taormina. The full scene, with a second young man almost entirely trimmed out of this postcard version, can be seen here.

Trimmed into an uncommon diamond shape, an early 20th Century portrait for two fond friends. Interesting, but I daresay a little difficult to frame at that angle; perhaps this one was kept instead on a study desk, or in a drawer of treasured posessions.

Trimmed into an uncommon diamond shape, an early 20th Century portrait for two fond friends. Interesting, but I daresay a little difficult to frame at that angle; perhaps this one was kept instead on a study desk, or in a drawer of treasured posessions.

A second shot from the 1910 Lads and Lore series by photographer Edmund Edwinstone, demonstrating again his bold and unashamedly sexual content in a time when homoerotic male nudity tended to be given a classical camouflage, a pretence of being purely intellectual and artistic to conveniently conceal any more lustful reasons to acquire it. Aside from the historical interest, this is simply a superb photo, such beaming grins from both models as they display their stripped and sun-drenched bodies before the camera, with one compact and admirably muscular while the other is lithe and long and lean - very different but equally magnificent!

A second shot from the 1910 Lads and Lore series by photographer Edmund Edwinstone, demonstrating again his bold and unashamedly sexual content in a time when homoerotic male nudity tended to be given a classical camouflage, a pretence of being purely intellectual and artistic to conveniently conceal any more lustful reasons to acquire it.
Aside from the historical interest, this is simply a superb photo, such beaming grins from both models as they display their stripped and sun-drenched bodies before the camera, with one compact and admirably muscular while the other is lithe and long and lean - very different but equally magnificent!

This wonderful 19th century tintype photograph has it all : handsome chaps in splendid hats, a quite quite strange item of furniture to balance upon, the touching intimacy of their affectionate pose, and last but by no means least, the charming blush of hand-tinted red to their cheeks - perhaps a touch over-exaggerated on the right-hand fellow, or maybe he really did have rosy cheeks the developer was aiming to recreate accurately!

This wonderful 19th century tintype photograph has it all : handsome chaps in splendid hats, a quite quite strange item of furniture to balance upon, the touching intimacy of their affectionate pose, and last but by no means least, the charming blush of hand-tinted red to their cheeks - perhaps a touch over-exaggerated on the right-hand fellow, or maybe he really did have rosy cheeks the developer was aiming to recreate accurately!

My previous stereoscopic image was rather well-received, despite our inability to see the clever three-dimensional effect here on an ordinary screen, so I thought I’d find you a few more! This time the differences between panels are less apparent, the model himself appears almost identical in each, but we can see the curtain and pillar are noticably closer in the image for the right eye.

My previous stereoscopic image was rather well-received, despite our inability to see the clever three-dimensional effect here on an ordinary screen, so I thought I’d find you a few more! This time the differences between panels are less apparent, the model himself appears almost identical in each, but we can see the curtain and pillar are noticably closer in the image for the right eye.

A gorgeous scene from Wilhelm von Gloeden, on the familiar terrace of Plüschow’s home in Posillipo outside Naples. It appears he even borrowed the black-trimmed leopardskin so often featured in his cousin’s pictures, as the signature removes any doubt that this could be an accidentally mis-credited piece from the catalogue of the other man. 1914, just legible, refers to the year this print was made, not the taking of the photograph - it dates to between 1896 and 1898.

A gorgeous scene from Wilhelm von Gloeden, on the familiar terrace of Plüschow’s home in Posillipo outside Naples. It appears he even borrowed the black-trimmed leopardskin so often featured in his cousin’s pictures, as the signature removes any doubt that this could be an accidentally mis-credited piece from the catalogue of the other man. 1914, just legible, refers to the year this print was made, not the taking of the photograph - it dates to between 1896 and 1898.

Unable to decide which of them ought take the single seat? Two well-dressed gents with bowler hats in hand, photographed in the 1880s. Another example of a picture which has been reversed in processing - their buttons are on the wrong side!

Unable to decide which of them ought take the single seat? Two well-dressed gents with bowler hats in hand, photographed in the 1880s. Another example of a picture which has been reversed in processing - their buttons are on the wrong side!

Assured and utterly self-posessed, this sturdy young man poses with a hearty confidence in his own masculine charms - not for him the gentle drape of delicate willowy limbs, no sweetly spilling flowers decorate his scene; rustic roughness sets off his raw and earthy allure, creating an erotic and unforgettable portrait of enduring appeal.

Assured and utterly self-posessed, this sturdy young man poses with a hearty confidence in his own masculine charms - not for him the gentle drape of delicate willowy limbs, no sweetly spilling flowers decorate his scene; rustic roughness sets off his raw and earthy allure, creating an erotic and unforgettable portrait of enduring appeal.

One more submission from frequent contributor Alan : when I first saw this remarkably modern-looking portrait I wasn’t certain of its authenticity - many a present-day photoshoot has been creatively edited to appear weathered and old - but it is indeed genuine. Taken in Tunisia circa 1910, by Rudolf Lehnert, this image and others like it were to find fame when published in the form of postcards, from 1924 onwards.

One more submission from frequent contributor Alan : when I first saw this remarkably modern-looking portrait I wasn’t certain of its authenticity - many a present-day photoshoot has been creatively edited to appear weathered and old - but it is indeed genuine. Taken in Tunisia circa 1910, by Rudolf Lehnert, this image and others like it were to find fame when published in the form of postcards, from 1924 onwards.

A generous reader’s kind donation to the collection, an unusual and eminently interesting tintype image, which appears to have been woefully ill-treated in the past - how fortunate that it survived at all!

A generous reader’s kind donation to the collection, an unusual and eminently interesting tintype image, which appears to have been woefully ill-treated in the past - how fortunate that it survived at all!

A fine Victorian stereoscopic photograph with a musical theme, a handsome violinist poses entirely nude - for reasons unexplained, as this is not a profession or pastime generally performed without respectable attire! This must have been a naughty delight at the time, the double image forming a fascinating three-dimensional illusion (a forerunner of the later 3D photographs and film viewed with coloured glasses) and as with all new technological innovations, swiftly turned toward making novel forms of erotica.

A fine Victorian stereoscopic photograph with a musical theme, a handsome violinist poses entirely nude - for reasons unexplained, as this is not a profession or pastime generally performed without respectable attire! This must have been a naughty delight at the time, the double image forming a fascinating three-dimensional illusion (a forerunner of the later 3D photographs and film viewed with coloured glasses) and as with all new technological innovations, swiftly turned toward making novel forms of erotica.

An endearing little snapshot of some sort of game taking place, with boots braced sole to sole they each grip a stick and presumably see who can pull the hardest to win, if not a prize, at least the momentary glory!

An endearing little snapshot of some sort of game taking place, with boots braced sole to sole they each grip a stick and presumably see who can pull the hardest to win, if not a prize, at least the momentary glory!